In an increasingly digital age, the traditional law review has failed to provide utility to its readers in several key ways. As law review articles have increased in length, traditional readers have experienced increasing demands on their time. In addition, the fairly length publication cycle (coupled with annual staff turnover) has made publishing authors’ responses to already-published pieces and timely commentary on current trends and events increasingly difficult.

DLJ Online addresses this problem by providing judges, academics, practitioners, and students with an online supplement to the printed Duke Law Journal that publishes short, lightly-edited responses to the Journal’s printed pieces as well as other timely commentary at the same high level of quality as the print edition. A shorter publication process allows for more timely scholarship.

Short contributions ranging between 2000 and 5000 words above the line will come from two sources: (1) solicitations of judges, academics, and practitioners by members of the Duke Law Journal’s Executive Committee, and (2) unsolicited submissions from judges, academics, practitioners, and students.

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Submissions from 2022

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Spurious Pedigree of the "Valid-When-Made" Doctrine, Adam J. Levitin

Submissions from 2018

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Data Indicate Second Amendment Underenforcement, David Kopel

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What does Puerto Rican Citizenship Mean for Puerto Rico’s Legal Status?, Joseph Blocher and Mitu Gulati

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You Can Lead A Horse to Water: Heller and the Future of Second Amendment Scholarship, Eric Ruben and Joseph Blocher

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The Constitutional Politics Heller Launched, Michael C. Dorf

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Collaborate Construction of a New Legal Field, Ronald F. Wright and Mark A. Hall

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Comment on Ruben and Blocher: Too Damn Many Cases, and an Absent Supreme Court, Sanford Levinson

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Is the Second Amendment A Second-Class Right?, Adam M. Samaha and Roy Germano

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Romanticism Meets Realism in Second Amendment Adjudication, Darrell A. H. Miller

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A Close Reading of an Excellent Distant Reading of Heller in the Courts, George A. Mocsary

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Quantitative Legal History—Empirics and the Rule of Law in the Antebellum Judiciary, Alfred L. Brophy

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Justice and Judgment Among the Whomever: An Anthropological Approach to Judging, John Conley

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Evaluating Judges and Judicial Institutions: Reorienting the Perspective, Mitu Gulati, David E. Klein, and David F. Levi

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Evaluating Judges, Harris Hartz

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Talking Judges, Jack Knight and Mitu Gulati

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Diversity, Tenure, and Dissent, Joanna Shepherd

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Investigating Judicial Responses to Rules, Emily Sherwin

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Distinguishing Causal and Normative Questions in Empirical Studies of Judging, Patrick S. Shin

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Devising Rule of Law Baselines: The Next Step in Quantitative Studies of Judging, Brian Z. Tamanaha

Submissions from 2013

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Emergency Power and Two-Tiered Legality, Curtis A. Bradley